The Australian Public Intellectual Network
  Home    Network Books    Australian Common Reader    Network Reviews    Virtual Library   
Tuesday, 22nd July 2014
      
 
API MENU

API Review of Books

Altitude BirdIssue 44
Features reviews by Kathleen Broderick, Linn Miller, Christine Choo, Bill Thorpe, David Ritter, Eve Vincent, Stephanie Bishop, Alison Miles, Richard Kay, Amanda Day, Bernard Whimpress, Mads Clausen, Marion May Campbell, Sylvia Alston, Catie Gilchrist, Eva Chapman, Lucy Dougan, Stephen Lawrence and Nathanael O'Reilly. Click here for more details.


Altitude

Altitude BirdPopular Music: Practices, Formations and Change - Australian Perspectives
The papers collected here in this special edition of Altitude offer a brief snapshot of popular music research broadly connected with Australia. The essays demonstrate the variety of theoretical and methodological approaches used by researchers in the fields of popular music studies and cultural studies to explore themes of popular music practice, formation and change in an Australian context. Click here for more details.



 
 
 
 
Network Scholars

Victoria: Flawed jewel in the Labor crown?

  • Nick Economou and Brian Costar
    In every election since the nadir reached in the 1990 contest when it lost nine seats, the Labor Party has, on two party preferred votes, out-polled the Liberal- National Coalition in Victoria. Even the 1996 election in which it suffered one of its worst national defeats, Labor was still able to achieve a majority of the two party vote (50.3%) even though the Coalition won a majority of seats (Economou and Costar 1997, 104). In the lead-up to the 2001 election, commentators and some Labor strategists forecast a strong Labor performance in Victoria. Not only were opinion polls indicating that ...
    Click here to read more.

Network Review of Books

Banana Bending: Asian-Australian and Asian-Canadian Literatures (2003)

  • imageReviewed by Rita Wong in the February 2004 issue.
    A timely contribution to East Asian-Australian and East Asian-Canadian literary studies, Banana Bending situates texts within layers of nation, community and the gendered self. The simultaneous existence of diasporic and nationally located multicultural communities means that texts racialised as 'Asian' are always both inside and outside the nations in which they were written and published; as such, Tseen Khoo fruitfully uses her comparative study to examine the tensions imposed and offered by national contexts. Banana Bending provides readings that facilitate the active rebuilding and ... read more.
     

Tightrope Horizon (2003)

  • imageReviewed by Andrew Johnson in the April 2004 issue.
    The New Poets series from Five Islands Press has, with the addition of this group of six, now put fifty-four Australian poets into print. The 'new' of the series title might suggest to some that the poets presented are young, and if not previously unpublished at least relatively unknown in print. Neither of these assumptions is correct. All of the poets have appeared, frequently, in print in a variety of Australian and international journals, magazines and daily papers, and while it is irrelevant as a category for judging the merit of the poetry, or much else for that matter, it might also be ... read more.

The Artificial Horizon: Imagining the Blue Mountains (2003)

  • imageReviewed by Paul Genoni in the February 2004 issue.
    This is an odd book. Odd at least in the sense that it fits outside the most obvious forms of history and/or ethnography to which it might immediately appear to belong. Any reader who comes to The Artificial Horizon with an expectation of finding a conventional local history of the Blue Mountains will be badly disappointed. This is a point willingly conceded by Martin Thomas in his introduction, in which he states that, 'This is a study that does not fit comfortably within a disciplinary niche. Suggesting possibilities for both narrative and movement, it does not attempt to order the past ... read more.

Reform and Resistance in Aboriginal Education: The Australian Experience (2003)

  • imageReviewed by Jeannie Herbert in the September 2004 issue.
    This publication makes a worthwhile contribution to the on-going dilemma confronting many Australian educators -- how to change Aboriginal Australian perspectives regarding the value of mainstream education. In particular this book focuses on 'the most important education issue for Aboriginal people: their relationship to the State school system during the compulsory years of schooling'. (2003:7) While acknowledging the diversity of the Aboriginal experience, hence the complexity of the issues that have impacted upon individual and collective educational experiences, the editors have drawn on ... read more.

History and Native Title (2003)

  • imageReviewed by Elizabeth Coleman in the March 2004 issue.
    Published ten years after the introduction of the Native Title Act, the sixteen essays published in this issue of Studies in Western Australian History present a 'snap-shot' of the outcomes of a legal solution to the moral problems created by colonialism. The essays, written by Aboriginal people and historians involved in the native title process, discuss the possibilities opened up by the Act, and the bitter disappointments and achievements that flowed from it. As such, History and Native Title is an important historical document in its own right. The editors, Christine Choo and Shawn ... read more.

Compound Eye (2003)

  • imageReviewed by Andrew Johnson in the April 2004 issue.
    The New Poets series from Five Islands Press has, with the addition of this group of six, now put fifty-four Australian poets into print. The 'new' of the series title might suggest to some that the poets presented are young, and if not previously unpublished at least relatively unknown in print. Neither of these assumptions is correct. All of the poets have appeared, frequently, in print in a variety of Australian and international journals, magazines and daily papers, and while it is irrelevant as a category for judging the merit of the poetry, or much else for that matter, it might also be ... read more.



 
The Australian Common Reader Project

Need to Contact Us?